Quantcast
News

College Hockey:
Humanitarian Finalists Named

Five players exhibiting strong commitment to their communities, their teams, and their studies have been named finalists for the 2000 Humanitarian Award, presented annually to college hockey’s finest citizen.

The group includes four men — one a returning finalist from last year — and one woman:

Craig Brown, a three-year letterman and assistant captain of the UMass-Lowell River Hawks.

Juliana Shantz-Dunn, a senior and two-time captain of the Yale women’s hockey team.

James Leger, a three-year letterman and captain of defending NCAA Division I national champion Maine.

Ryan Reinheller, a junior at the Alaska-Fairbanks and a finalist a year ago. In the five-year history of the Humanitarian Award, Reinheller is the first repeat finalist.

Jay Woodcroft, a three-year letterman and captain at Alabama-Hunstville. Woodcroft is the second straight UAH player to be a finalist, following Jamie Baby last year.

The announcement of this year’s recipient will be made on Friday, April 7, in Providence, R.I., as part of the festivities surrounding the NCAA Frozen Four.
This will be the fifth year the Award will be presented.

Boston University goalie J.P. McKersie received the initial Humanitarian Award in 1996. Michigan defenseman Blake Sloan was the 1997 recipient, while Wisconsin forward Erik Raygor was the 1998 Humanitarian. A year ago, RIT defenseman Kristine Pierce became the first woman and the first non-Division I player to receive the award.


The following is a self-policing forum for discussing views on this story. Comments that are derogatory, make personal attacks, are abusive, or contain profanity or racism will be removed at our discretion. USCHO.com is not responsible for comments posted by users. Please report any inappropriate or offensive comments by clicking the “Flag” link next to that comment in order to alert the moderator.

Please also keep “woofing,” taunting, and otherwise unsportsmanlike behavior to a minimum. Your posts will more than likely be deleted, and worse yet, you reflect badly on yourself, your favorite team and your conference.