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College Hockey:
RPI Men’s Assistant, Cahill, Named Head Coach of Women’s Program

— Bill Cahill, the assistant men’s coach at Rensselaer for the past seven seasons, has been named the new head coach of RPI’s women’s program.

Cahill replaces Ryan Stone, who left to take an assistant coaching position at Brown. Unlike the men’s program, RPI’s women play in the ECAC on the Division III level.

“RPI is a great school to coach at and I’m very thankful for this opportunity,” Cahill said. “It’s extremely exciting to me because women’s ice hockey is growing by leaps and bounds. I’m really looking forward to the challenge of keeping this program near the top of the standings year after year.”

For the past five years, Cahill has been in his second stint as an assistant men’s coach with the Engineers, working under current head coach Dan Fridgen. In his first stint with the Engineers, from 1988-90, Cahill was an assistant for former head coaches Mike Addesa and Buddy Powers, while also serving a stint as interim head coach in 1989.

Before returning to Rensselaer in 1995, Cahill spent five years at Norwich University, the last three (1992-95) as the head coach. He has also been a head men’s coach at the New Hampton School (1986-88) and Assumption (1983-86). Overall as a college head coach, Cahill, a 1973 graduate of Norwich, has a 75-55-3 (.575) record.

Cahill will begin his duties as head women’s ice hockey coach immediately. No replacement for his vacated men’s assistant position has been named.


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