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College Hockey:
Hynes Leaves Wisconsin for USNTDP

— John Hynes has been named U.S. National Development Coach with the organization’s National Team Development Program (NTDP) in Ann Arbor, Mich. Hynes will oversee the NTDP along with fellow U.S. National Development Coach David Quinn (Ann Arbor, Mich.) while serving as head coach of the U.S. National Under-18 Team for the remainder of this season.

Both Hynes and Quinn are Boston University graduates.

Hynes fills a position left vacant when Moe Mantha announced his resignation Oct. 28. Prior to this appointment he was serving as an assistant coach at Wisconsin under former U.S. National Development Coach Mike Eaves.

“This is a wonderful opportunity for me and a significant step in my coaching career,” Hynes said. “It is a truly unique position in the sport because it offers so many different experiences through a schedule that includes international, college and Junior hockey competition. It really is a one-of-a-kind challenge that I’m looking forward to pursuing.”

Hynes began his coaching career at his alma mater, Boston University, in 1997 as an assistant under Jack Parker. That season he helped guide the Terriers to the Hockey East regular-season title and a berth in the NCAA tournament.

He now returns for his third stint as a member of the USA Hockey NTDP coaching ranks. During the 1998-99 and 1999-2000 seasons, Hynes was a graduate assistant coach with the NTDP, working with both the U.S. National Under-17 and Under-18 Teams. During this time he served as a member of the coaching staff for Team USA at the 1999 and 2000 International Ice Hockey Federation (IIHF) World Under-18 World Championships. In addition to his roles behind the bench, Hynes was responsible for the strength and conditioning regimen of both teams.

He spent the 2000-01 season at Massachusetts-Lowell as an assistant coach, helping the River Hawks reach the finals of the Hockey East tournament after finishing in last place during the previous year.

Hynes returned to the NTDP in 2001 as an assistant coach under Eaves with the U.S. National Under-18 Team. He served as a member of the coaching staff that guided the U.S. to a gold medal at the 2002 IIHF World Under-18 Championship in Piestany, Slovakia. It was the first gold medal for the United States in an A-Pool IIHF World Championship, excluding the Olympics, since 1933.

During his previous tenures as an assistant coach with the U.S. National Under-17 and Under-18 Teams, Hynes helped lead his squads to three gold medals and two silver medals in international competition. With Hynes’ help, 15 graduates of the NTDP were selected in the 2002 National Hockey League Entry Draft, including five in the first round.

Rejoining collegiate hockey, Hynes accepted the assistant coaching position under Eaves at Wisconsin prior to the 2002-03 season. Since then he has worked with both the Badgers’ forwards and defensemen, while coordinating the team’s strength and conditioning program.

On May 23 Hynes was named an assistant coach under Eaves for the 2004 United States National Junior Team at the 2004 IIHF World Junior Championship in Finland. Hynes’ role with Team USA will not change as a result of his new position when the team competes from Dec. 25, 2003 through Jan. 5, 2004. It will represent his second such assignment after helping lead the 2002 U.S. National Junior Team to a 4-1-2 record in the Czech Republic.

A 1997 graduate of Boston University, Hynes was a three-year letter winner for the Terriers as a forward and participated in four straight NCAA Frozen Four tournaments. The highlight of his college playing career came when BU captured the 1995 NCAA Division I National Championship in front of his home crowd in Providence, R.I.


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