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College Hockey:
Bothwell Leaves Canada For Vermont Women’s Job

Vermont has named Tim Bothwell, an assistant on the Canadian Women’s Olympic Team that won a gold medal this past winter at the 2006 Olympics, as its new head women’s hockey coach.

“We are very fortunate to have attracted a coach as accomplished as Tim Bothwell to UVM,” said UVM Athletic Director Robert Corran. “His record of success as a player and coach at every level of hockey is truly exceptional. His commitment to the values of educational sport and the holistic development of student-athletes will serve him well in building a nationally competitive women’s hockey program at UVM. We are thrilled to have Tim bring his unique experience and perspective to our department and the university. I know that we will all benefit greatly from his contribution and I look forward with much anticipation to working with him in the coming years.”

“I am extremely pleased and very much looking forward to the tremendous opportunity and exciting challenge of leading the Catamount women’s hockey program,” said Bothwell.

“There are many things that attracted me to this position, the primary one being; the commitment demonstrated by the University and athletic department leadership to building a nationally competitive team. The changes in UVM athletics over the past few years brought about by Bob, his staff and the coaches clearly demonstrates a firm commitment to President Fogel’s 10-year vision… ‘the foundation upon which the entire enterprise must rest is excellence’. Going forward, the women’s hockey program will be no different; we will pursue excellence in every area in the classroom, on the ice and as representatives of both UVM, the city and the state.”

“An equally important consideration for me was the wonderful partnership between University of Vermont and the community of Burlington which combine to form one of the premiere academic/residential environments in all of North America.”

“I can’t wait to get started and take full advantage of that partnership to build a championship caliber program.”

Bothwell, a native of Burlington, Ontario, has spent the last three years coaching women’s hockey in Canada. He served as the associate head coach for the Calgary Oval X-Treme, first in the NWHL then with the same team when they moved to the recently formed Western Women’s League. In 2003-04, Bothwell assisted Tomas Pacina in leading the team to a record of 23-5-1 and the NWHL League Championship. In 2004-05 the team posted a record of 27-5-4 overall and went unbeaten in the new WWHL with a 19-0-2 mark. The X-Treme went on to win the first ever WWHL League Championship.

Most recently, from 2004-2006, Bothwell served as assistant coach for the Canadian National Women’s Team. In 2004-05, the Canadians won the gold medal in the Four Nations Cup and the silver medal at the World Hockey Championship. In 2005-06, Bothwell was behind the bench as Team Canada won the gold medal at the 2006 Winter Olympic Games in Torino.

As an assistant coach with the national team, Bothwell was responsible for the team’s penalty kill, working with the defense and individual skill development.

Bothwell began his career as a three-year letter-winner at Brown University (1974-78) as a member of the men’s hockey team. He was a two-time captain for the Bears and was named to the All-ECAC Team as a senior. He also earned All-Ivy Team honors three straight years and is a member of the Brown University Athletic Hall of Fame.

Bothwell helped guide the Bears to a third-place finish in the 1976 NCAA Championship. That same year, Brown won the Ivy League Championship and advanced to the finals of the ECAC Tournament.

Bothwell graduated from Brown in 1978 with a Bachelor of Arts degree in economics and political science.

After completing his collegiate career, Bothwell signed as a free agent with the New York Rangers and played in the organization for four seasons (1978-82). During his stint in New York, Bothwell played for Herb Brooks and Fred Shero and was a teammate of Phil Esposito, among others while with the Rangers.

Following the 1982 season, Bothwell moved on to the St. Louis Blues organization and spent three years with the team. St. Louis made the Stanley Cup Playoffs each year Bothwell was with the team.

Bothwell spent one season with the Hartford Whalers in 1985-86 before returning to the Blues for three more years to close out his NHL career. Overall, Bothwell played in 502 NHL games during his 11-year career.

Following his NHL career, Bothwell earned his first coaching experience as a player/assistant with the New Haven Nighthawks of the AHL (American Hockey League). Bothwell’s first head coaching job came during the 1990 season when he took over the helm of the Medicine Hat Tigers of the WHL (Western Hockey League). Bothwell also served as the head coach of the Phoenix Roadrunners of the IHL (International Hockey League) for two seasons from 1992-1994, assisting the parent Los Angeles Kings during their run to the Stanley Cup Final in 1993.

In July 1994, Bothwell returned to the collegiate ranks taking over as head coach of the University of Calgary men’s hockey team. The Dinos won two league championships and advanced to the national championship three times. Bothwell was named CIS National Coach of the Year in 1997.

In 2001, Bothwell left Calgary to return to the NHL, this time as an assistant coach with the Atlanta Thrashers. He spent two seasons behind the bench in Atlanta.

Bothwell is the third head coach in the program’s history and just the second in 10 years. He replaces Dennis Miller who resigned in April.


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