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College Hockey:
Palmieri Leaves Notre Dame for Anaheim After Freshman Season

Kyle Palmieri became the third player to leave Notre Dame early this offseason after signing a three-year, entry-level contract with the NHL’s Anaheim Ducks on Tuesday.

The deal is for the rookie maximum — $900,000 per season at the NHL level, $90,000 of which per season is a signing bonus; $67,500 per season in the minor leagues.

The winger had nine goals and 17 points in 33 games as a freshman for the Fighting Irish.

Related link: Early departures in 2010 offseason

He was the Ducks’ first-round pick, No. 26 overall, in the 2009 NHL entry draft.

 Palmieri Leaves Notre Dame for Anaheim After Freshman Season

A pair of defensemen earlier left Notre Dame with eligibility remaining. Ian Cole signed with St. Louis and Teddy Ruth joined Columbus, each forgoing his final season.

Palmieri, who is in Lake Placid, N.Y., at USA Hockey’s Junior Evaluation Camp, ran into legal trouble earlier this offseason.

He was arrested, along with Notre Dame’s Riley Sheahan, in April. Palmieri was charged with two counts of resisting arrest and minor alcohol consumption.

Palmieri’s agent, Steve Bartlett, said in an e-mail that the legal proceedings had no impact on the decision to turn pro. Palmieri was planning to return to Notre Dame for his sophomore season until Anaheim made the offer, Bartlett said.

Bartlett also said the resisting arrest charges were dropped, leaving only a fine for underage drinking.


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