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Bracketology: A first try at predicting the NCAA pairings

It’s time once again to do what we like to call Bracketology, college hockey style. It’s our weekly look at how I believe the NCAA tournament will wind up come selection time.

It’s a look into what are the possible thought processes behind selecting and seeding the NCAA tournament teams.

This is the first installment of our Bracketology for the 2010-11 season, and we’ll be bringing you a new one every week until we make our final picks before the field is announced on March 20. Make sure to check out our other entries on the Bracketology Blog, where we’ll keep you entertained, guessing and educated throughout the rest of the season.

Here are the facts:

• Sixteen teams are selected to participate in the national tournament.

• There are four regional sites (East — Bridgeport, Conn.; Northeast — Manchester, N.H.; Midwest — Green Bay, Wis.; West — St. Louis)

• A host institution which is invited to the tournament plays in the regional for which it is the host, and cannot be moved. There are three host institutions this year, Yale in Bridgeport, New Hampshire in Manchester and Michigan Tech in Green Bay. St. Louis’ host is the CCHA, not a specific team.

• Seedings will not be switched, as opposed to years past. To avoid undesirable first-round matchups, including intra-conference games (see below), teams will be moved among regionals, not reseeded.

Here are the NCAA’s guidelines on the matter, per a meeting of the championship committee:

In setting up the tournament, the committee begins with a list of priorities to ensure a successful tournament on all fronts including competitive equity, financial success and likelihood of playoff-type atmosphere at each regional site. For the model, the following is a basic set of priorities:

• The top four teams as ranked by the committee are the four No. 1 seeds and will be placed in the bracket so that if all four teams advance to the Men’s Frozen Four, the No. 1 seed will play the No. 4 seed and the No. 2 seed will play the No. 3 seed in the semifinals.

• Host institutions that qualify will be placed at home.

• No. 1 seeds are placed as close to home as possible in order of their ranking 1-4.

• Conference matchups in first round are avoided, unless five or more teams from one conference are selected, then the integrity of the bracket will be preserved.

• Once the five automatic qualifiers and 11 at-large teams are selected, the next step is to develop four groups from the committee’s ranking of 1-16. The top four teams are the No. 1 seeds. The next four are targeted as No. 2 seeds. The next four are No. 3 seeds and the last four are No. 4 seeds. These groupings will be referred to as “bands.”

Given these facts, here is the top 16 of the current PairWise Rankings (PWR), and the conference leaders (through all games of Jan. 25, 2011):

1 Yale
2t Minnesota-Duluth
2t North Dakota
2t Denver
5t Boston College
5t Michigan
7t Wisconsin
7t Rensselaer
9 Notre Dame
10 New Hampshire
11t Merrimack
11t Western Michigan
13t Union
13t Nebraska-Omaha
13t Dartmouth
16 Miami
– Rochester Institute of Technology

Current conference leaders based on winning percentage:

Atlantic Hockey: RIT
CCHA: Michigan
ECAC: Yale
Hockey East: New Hampshire
WCHA: Denver

Notes

• The Bracketology assumes that the season has ended and there are no more games to be played. i.e., the NCAA tournament starts tomorrow.

• Because there are an uneven amount of games played inside each conference, I will be using winning percentage, not points accumulated, to determine who the current leader in each conference is. This team is my assumed conference tournament champion.

Step one

From the committee’s report, choose the 16 teams in the tournament.

We break ties in the PWR by looking at the individual comparisons among the tied teams, and add in any current league leaders that are not currently in the top 16. The only team that is not is RIT.

From there, we can start looking at the ties and bubbles in a more detailed fashion.

The ties and bubbles consist of Minnesota-Duluth, North Dakota and Denver at No. 2, Boston College and Michigan at No. 5, Wisconsin and Rensselaer at No. 7, Merrimack and Western Michigan at No. 11, and Union, Nebraska-Omaha and Dartmouth at No. 13.

We break all of our ties based upon the RPI.

Therefore the 16 teams in the tournament, in rank order, are:

1 Yale
2 Minnesota-Duluth
3 North Dakota
4 Denver
5 Boston College
6 Michigan
7 Wisconsin
8 Rensselaer
9 Notre Dame
10 New Hampshire
11 Merrimack
12 Western Michigan
13 Union
14 Nebraska-Omaha
15 Dartmouth
16 RIT

Step two

Now it’s time to assign the seeds.

No. 1 seeds — Yale, Minnesota-Duluth, North Dakota, Denver
No. 2 seeds — Boston College, Michigan, Wisconsin, Rensselaer
No. 3 seeds — Notre Dame, New Hampshire, Merrimack, Western Michigan
No. 4 seeds — Union, Nebraska-Omaha, Dartmouth, RIT

Step three

Place the No. 1 seeds in regionals. Following the guidelines, there is one host team in this grouping, Yale, so Yale must be placed in its home regional, the East Regional, Bridgeport.

We now place the other No. 1 seeds based on proximity to the regional sites.

No. 1 Yale is placed in the East Regional in Bridgeport.
No. 2 Minnesota-Duluth is placed in the Midwest Regional in Green Bay.
No. 3 North Dakota is placed in the West Regional in St. Louis.
No. 4 Denver is placed in the Northeast Regional in Manchester.

Step four

Now we place the other 12 teams so as to avoid intra-conference matchups if possible.

Begin by filling in each bracket by banding groups. Remember that teams are not assigned to the regional closest to their campus sites by ranking order within the banding (unless you are a host school, in which case you must be assigned to your home regional).

If this is the case, as it was last year, then the committee should seed so that the quarterfinals are seeded such that the four regional championships are played by No. 1 vs. No. 8, No. 2 vs. No. 7, No. 3 vs. No. 6 and No. 4 vs. No. 5.

So therefore:

No. 2 seeds

No. 8 Rensselaer is placed in No. 1 Yale’s regional, the East Regional.
No. 7 Wisconsin is placed in No. 2 Minnesota-Duluth’s regional, the Midwest Regional.
No. 6 Michigan is placed in No. 3 North Dakota’s regional, the West
Regional.
No. 5 Boston College is placed in No. 4 Denver’s regional, the Northeast Regional.

No. 3 seeds

Our bracketing system has one regional containing seeds 1, 8, 9, and 16, another with 2, 7, 10, 15, another with 3, 6, 11, 14 and another with 4, 5, 12 and 13.

But we have one host institution, New Hampshire, which needs to be placed first.

Therefore:

No. 10 New Hampshire is placed in No. 5 Boston College’s regional, the Northeast Regional.
No. 9 Notre Dame is placed in No. 8 Rensselaer’s regional, the East Regional.
No. 11 Merrimack is placed in No. 7 Wisconsin’s regional, the Midwest Regional.
No. 12 Western Michigan is placed in No. 6 Michigan’s regional, the West Regional.

No. 4 seeds

One more time, taking No. 16 vs. No. 1, No. 15 vs. No. 2, etc.

No. 16 RIT is sent to No. 1 Yale’s regional, the East Regional.
No. 15 Dartmouth is sent to No. 2 Minnesota-Duluth’s regional, the Midwest Regional.
No. 14 Nebraska-Omaha is sent to No. 3 North Dakota’s regional, the West Regional.
No. 13 Union is sent to No. 4 Denver’s regional, the Northeast Regional.

The brackets as we have set them up:

West Regional:
Nebraska-Omaha vs. North Dakota
Western Michigan vs. Michigan

Midwest Regional:
Dartmouth vs. Minnesota-Duluth
Merrimack vs. Wisconsin

East Regional:
RIT vs. Yale
Notre Dame vs. Rensselaer

Northeast Regional:
Union vs. Denver
New Hampshire vs. Boston College

Our first concern is avoiding intra-conference matchups. We have a West Regional with two of them, and a UNH-BC matchup in the Northeast.

Let’s take care of the UNH-BC matchup first. We can’t move UNH because the Wildcats are the host institution, so BC must be moved. The next ranking after BC at No. 5 is Michigan, No. 6. So we switch those two teams.

We’ve now solved two of our intraconference matchup problems.

The last one to solve is UNO-North Dakota.

With three WCHA teams at the No. 1 seed band, we can switch UNO only to a matchup against Yale. So that’s what we do.

So our tournament now becomes:

West Regional:
RIT vs. North Dakota
Western Michigan vs. Boston College

Midwest Regional:
Dartmouth vs. Minnesota-Duluth
Merrimack vs. Wisconsin

East Regional:
Nebraska-Omaha vs. Yale
Notre Dame vs. Rensselaer

Northeast Regional:
Union vs. Denver
New Hampshire vs. Michigan

Do we like the way this looks? We have no intraconference matchups, so we are OK. Bracket integrity seems to be OK.

Do we have an attendance issue? I would say that there are some shaky issues there.

Can we make it better? Of course we can.

Let’s go back to our original bracketing.

West Regional:
Nebraska-Omaha vs. North Dakota
Western Michigan vs. Michigan

Midwest Regional:
Dartmouth vs. Minnesota-Duluth
Merrimack vs. Wisconsin

East Regional:
RIT vs. Yale
Notre Dame vs. Rensselaer

Northeast Regional:
Union vs. Denver
New Hampshire vs. Boston College

Now, remember, we have to switch out Boston College first. This is a must. But if you switch BC with the next ranking, you send BC out west and bring Michigan east, which creates a little bit of an attendance issue.

So how can we change that?

We can avoid the UNH-BC matchup by swapping BC with Rensselaer. That way, two big fan bases stay in the East.

Let’s look at it now.

West Regional:
Nebraska-Omaha vs. North Dakota
Western Michigan vs. Michigan

Midwest Regional:
Dartmouth vs. Minnesota-Duluth
Merrimack vs. Wisconsin

East Regional:
RIT vs. Yale
Notre Dame vs. Boston College

Northeast Regional:
Union vs. Denver
New Hampshire vs. Rensselaer

The East and Northeast look good now. We’ve maintained our attendance and straightened out our intraconference matchup.

Now on to the other matchups.

As we mentioned, UNO has to play Yale in the first round to avoid the WCHA-WCHA matchup. So we have to make that switch.

West Regional:
RIT vs. North Dakota
Western Michigan vs. Michigan

Midwest Regional:
Dartmouth vs. Minnesota-Duluth
Merrimack vs. Wisconsin

East Regional:
Nebraska-Omaha vs. Yale
Notre Dame vs. Boston College

Northeast Regional:
Union vs. Denver
New Hampshire vs. Rensselaer

But, at the moment, RIT is not in the top 16, therefore, should be paired with the highest seed. In this case, that’s Minnesota-Duluth.

And then to take care of the WMU-Michigan matchup, we swap WMU with Merrimack.

West Regional:
Dartmouth vs. North Dakota
Merrimack vs. Michigan

Midwest Regional:
RIT vs. Minnesota-Duluth
Western Michigan vs. Wisconsin

East Regional:
Nebraska-Omaha vs. Yale
Notre Dame vs. Boston College

Northeast Regional:
Union vs. Denver
New Hampshire vs. Rensselaer

So let’s look at our brackets now. It looks pretty good.

In Green Bay we have UMD and Wisconsin, great bracket for attendance.

In Bridgeport we have Yale, BC and Notre Dame. I like that as well.

In Manchester we have New Hampshire and Rensselaer, a nice draw.

In St. Louis we have Michigan and North Dakota, not bad either.

Anything else we can switch up?

I think that I can make a case for one more switch — swapping Dartmouth and Union.

A Manchester regional with two New Hampshire teams? No offense to Union, which may draw fans, but Dartmouth playing in New Hampshire? That sounds like a no-brainer to me.

West Regional:
Union vs. North Dakota
Merrimack vs. Michigan

Midwest Regional:
RIT vs. Minnesota-Duluth
Western Michigan vs. Wisconsin

East Regional:
Nebraska-Omaha vs. Yale
Notre Dame vs. Boston College

Northeast Regional:
Dartmouth vs. Denver
New Hampshire vs. Rensselaer

That is it. My bracket for the week.

More thoughts and education and plain wit on the blog. We’ll see you here next week for the next Bracketology.


The following is a self-policing forum for discussing views on this story. Comments that are derogatory, make personal attacks, are abusive, or contain profanity or racism will be removed at our discretion. USCHO.com is not responsible for comments posted by users. Please report any inappropriate or offensive comments by clicking the “Flag” link next to that comment in order to alert the moderator.

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  • Mark

    “No offense to Union, which may draw fans, but Dartmouth playing in New Hampshire? That sounds like a no-brainer to me.”

    -As a long time Union fan I can asssure you that we do not draw fans.

  • Guest

    Jayson,

    Great job as always. One request for a casual and lazy fan: each time you show the bracket in your text, could you give the name of the city where the regional is and the overall seed of each of the 4 teams? e.g.:

    West Regional (St. Louis):
    Union (13) vs. North Dakota (3)
    Merrimack (11) vs. Michigan (6)

    This would help us be able to see at a glance what the status for attendance and bracket integrity looks like, without having to scroll back up frequently.

    Thanks!

    Read more: http://www.uscho.com/2011/01/27/bracketology-a-first-try-at-predicting-the-ncaa-pairings/#ixzz1CEWyqNLA

  • Paula Weston

    Three teams from the CCHA…and one of them is Western Michigan! I love it!

    • streaker

      And if Miami and Alaska can make a run….

      • J108710

        I’m shocked Miami has struggled the way it has…

        • sW24

          They will continue to struggle over the next 2 weekends with series against Notre Dame and Michigan. They very well may end up out of the tournament this year. Quality of depth in the CCHA is vastly improved this year and Miami is realizing that the hard way.

  • Jdorf40

    This actually looks pretty sweet. Unfortunately, as we all know, it won’t look anything like this in 2 months. That East Regional is stacked!

  • MP

    WCHA takes 3 of the 4 #1 seeds, further proving it is the best conference in college hockey.

    • sW24

      Why hasn’t the conference produced a national champion recently then if it the best conference in hockey? Please explain….

    • Anonymous

      Regular season so far this year, maybe. Hockey East still has a pretty strong claim to the title… last three national champions, five teams in the final in the last five years. Actually, you can bring that last one out quite a ways back: 18 Hockey East teams in the finals in the last 18 years.

    • J108710

      Get over yourself, MP. Hockey East has proven year after year, it can compete with WCHA. After going to the past 14 Frozen Fours, I have the utmost respect for the WCHA, as do most Hockey East fans and love when they play each other because they make for some great hockey. How come the “westerners” can’t feel the same way about Hockey East? Is it really that hard to show respect for another conference?
      I also found it a bit amusing when the WCHA fans made a big deal about how many national titles they had, when it was announced in Detroit last year. The only problem was, many of them were won before there was a WCHA, when you hear the Hockey East numbers… nothing before the league started counts toward the league winning a championship.

      • collegehockeyfan

        what he is trying to say perhaps, is that the WCHA has more depth in their conference, meaning they always have several teams that are at the top at the end of the year. This being said, you are correct, HE has put out alot of championship teams as of late.

        My personal take on it is that the WCHA has the more depth, but recently HE has 1 or 2 teams that are right up the caliber or even better than the top teams in the WCHA. But MP is right, the WCHA usually puts out 3-4 teams in the top 5. But obviously the WCHA hasn’t been able to raise the trophy lately, so I guess we will see when it comes right down to it. You also have to consider the frozen four is in Minnesota, and that is right in the heart of WCHA country. just like when the frozen four is in D.C. or Boston, thats right in the heart of HE country. You may think it doesn’t matter, but it really does.

        • J108710

          You may be right in what he means by it, but that is not how it is written. Top to bottom, the WCHA may be stronger most years, but not a lot stronger. Hockey East pretty consistently has 4, not 2… most years recently it has been BC, BU, UNH, and Maine. It also doesn’t take away from the fact that most WCHA fans have ZERO respect for Hockey East. As I said in my previous post I love HE/WCHA games, they are intense and good hockey… I even used to cheer for some WCHA teams until this “rivalry” of sorts has started, more so from the fans than the players.
          It definitely matters, I have been to them all. I actually had a great time in St. Paul and am looking forward to having a great time again.

          • Brett0909

            I think you’re ‘playing the game’ as much as MP when you make assumptions like “most WCHA fans have ZERO respect for Hockey East”. Please don’t lump us all in with a few fans that we’d just as soon hand off to another conference, if we could. Unfortunately, we seem to have a high % of them that are more vocal than your ‘average’ fan. All conferences have their bad seed fans, but yes, WCHA seems to have some pretty annoying ones.

            Anyway, I have a ton of respect for HE and the products they’ve brought year after year recently, and any WCHA fans who don’t are likely so full of their own bravado they can’t see past it. Same token though? Hearing HE/BC fans claim their ‘dynasty’ is the greatest in all sports, over and over again without any acknowledgment of the amount of luck and good fortune involved no doubt causes some of the retaliation. They’re both strong conferences, and their fans are going to stick up for them.

          • collegehockeyfan

            I’m a proud WCHA fan, but when it comes to tournament time, HE definately has had the edge when it comes to tournament time. But overall I like all college hockey, it doesn’t matter what conference it is. Hopefully we can see the WCHA take one home this year :)

          • J108710

            Thank you, Brett and collegehockeyfan, you are both exactly right and I probably shouldn’t have written the past comment quite the way I did. There are fans of a certain couple of schools that bother me. I generally do not speak out much, unless it’s something I feel very strongly about. I do also understand the BC fans, as I see them all the time.
            Anyways, it’s nice to have a couple of good, college hockey fans. Have a great season and good luck to whomever you cheer for. Should be another great Frozen Four, like most of them are. Your WCHA has a very goodchance this year.

          • MP

            Tongue and cheek boys. No disrespect was meant at all to any aforementioned conference or team. I share a mutual respect for conferences and teams alike and enjoy the “interleague” games, if you will.

            I wish the best of luck to all teams across the country (except 2 WCHA teams) and only hope for great hockey.

          • HENH10

            Agreed on MP… sorry I took that the wrong way… enjoy the rest of the season!

        • BCEagle01

          And Denver is right in the heart of the Northeast…oh wait, it isn’t. But wait, Detroit is in the Northeast…oh wait, that also isn’t. Guess your “region theory” falls a bit flat…Go Eagles!

    • Jimbo

      YEAH!!! WCHA is more awesome than Budweiser, guns and ice fishing!!! National champioship should just be the WCHA tournament every year!!!

      • Lucci

        Hockey east….last three titles…..enough said in response to this stupid blowhard

    • Lennyak1

      The WCHA can take all the seeds they can get, because they’ll need them again this year. Hasn’t BC been in 4 of the last 5 Finals games?

  • guest

    Shouldn’t R.I.T. be paired with Yale rather than UMD since Yale is the top overall seed?

    • Dan

      RIT is moved to the West because of intraconference match ups

  • http://www.uscho.com Todd D. Milewski

    Good call. We’ll see if we can get those included everywhere next week. Thanks.

  • Guest

    So the #1 seed has the #5 and #13 seeds in it’s regional instead of the #8 and #16? There’s a big difference between BC and RPI and another big difference between UNO and RIT.

    • LtPowers

      Yeah, as in one of them made the Frozen Four last year and the other didn’t.

  • guest

    I doubt the 3 top WCHA seeds will stay that way. They have to play each other a few more times and then at least one of them will drop down from a #1 seed.

    • collegehockeyfan

      actually DU, UND, or UMD all do not play each other again this season.

  • Goalie Fan

    Nice job on the article tho…. A+ for effort!

  • RBTGT

    UNO is a 4 seed and Wisconsin is 2 seed?

    UNO is ahead of Wisconsin in the WCHA standings and has been all year!

    UNO also has a harder strength of schedule, to-date.

    No matter, it’ll take care of itself on 2-10 and 2-11.

  • Puck

    Yale is going to dominate this thing

    • Siouxper

      I just had a good laugh.Thanks for making my day.

    • Lennyak1

      LMAO even harder than the Dartmouth rant!

  • FireTimWhitehead

    If any one conference “dominates” college hockey today, it’s clearly Hockey East. It was easy for Michigan/Minnesota/Wisconsin/etc. to win all their titles when there were just a handful of teams. Those programs are sort of like the Yankees and Canadiens of the 30′s, 40′s and 50′s. What real competition did they have? Since HEA started play in 1987, here is what they have accomplished:
    – 7 national championships, or 29% of titles won
    – 19 teams made the championship game; that means that 40% of all teams in the final game were from Hockey East
    – at least one Hockey East team played in the title game from 1997-2004, and again from 2006-2010. That’s two streaks of 8 and 5 straight years, or 13 of the past 14. That’s not only dominance. That’s absolutely owning college hockey.

    • heidi

      FireTimeWhitehead,
      You are delusional. HE is a good conference, but top to bottom year in and year out I’ll take the WCHA against anyone. The lack of players coming out of Mass. now certainly does not help the cause either. Talk to any NHL scouting director and see what conference they feel has the majority of the players. (which is also part of the WCHAs problem, players leaving early).

      • HENH10

        I totally agree that the amount of talent leaving early is hurting ALL of college hockey. I do disagree with a couple of points though…
        1. There is still a lot of talent coming out of Mass. and assuming I am correct by the name, FireTimWhitehead, Maine does not get most of their top notch talent from US born players anyways.
        2. Just because an NHL scout feels they make a better pro player does not mean the necessarily are better, make their team better, or make their conference better at the college level. There have been tons of mediocre college players that went on to great NHL careers and many top college players that did nothing. To further your point about leaving early, you can get the best players to come to your school, probably any school, as long as you are willing to sacrafice that scholarship for a guy who will be gone by the time he really figures out the college game.

        • heidi

          I’m not saying no talet is coming out of Mass. Just not like it used to be. They used to be almost on par with MN for producing college players and now they are only about half of what MN is producing. And before any Minnesotans come out and say their youth programs are just so superior save it. I think Mass hockey has just fallen off and MN hockey has stayed about the same. I think most if not all objective readers would agree with me on this.

          And I do realize many HE players are not coming from MASS, but having homegrown talent certainly does make and more importantly keep programs strong.

          • HENH10

            I am an objective reader on this one, as I have never thought Mass has had the same kind of talent as Minn has had, maybe close, but not as good. I also am not from Mass, so I could really care less where the talent comes from. They produce and have produced a number of top notch players and I think they will continue to, but Minn is far ahead of them.
            Ax far as Hockey East, I think they have had to adapt as the league has grown. The New England area just can not put out enough good players to fill all of the teams. My point above was about Maine, if you look at their roster, they have a number of Canadiens and always throw in a European player or two as well, those tend to be their best players.
            I just love great college hockey. Obviously a HE fan, but as long as it’s good, competitive hockey, that’s what really matters.

    • marlin3069

      Also, just to clarify your stats about the national titles, yes they do have 7. Which is 2 less then the WCHA in the same time span. Don’t make that stat seem like it’s so important if it’s not even the best.

    • Scott

      Sure, Hockey East winning three consecutive national titles is impressive, but you’re making their recent dominance out to be more than it is. The WCHA has been just as successful since your league’s inception, as well as recently.

      Doesn’t the fact that Hockey East wasn’t even created until 1987 say just a little?

      Since 1951, teams representing the WCHA have earned a record 36 NCAA Frozen Four (national) championships, finished as the runner-up another 27 times, and qualified for at least one berth in the Men’s Frozen Four in 54 of 58 seasons overall.

      And since 1987:

      – 9 national champions, or 38% of titles won
      – 14 teams in the championship game, or 29% of all teams
      – Six of the seven national champions from 2000-2006 were won by teams from the WCHA, and five straight from 2002-2006.

      I could also go into head-to-head results, which heavily favor the WCHA, but I don’t have the time right now.

      You can’t simply discount everything the WCHA accomplished before Hockey East was born. That certainly did not legitimize college hockey. I have respect for Hockey East, but if you demand that respect then show a little respect to the WCHA as their run as been just as impressive.

  • Demyyc

    too little emphasis on seeding – should be
    east – Yale,wis,notredame, RIT
    NE – Minn – D, Renseleer, NH, Dart
    west – North Dak, Mich, Merrimack, NBO
    midwest- Den BC, W. Mich, Union

  • BigGreenFan11

    This could finally be the year Dartmouth pulls through. We’re always better than UNH. The ECAC, perhaps the most underrated conference in the college hockey, really looks a threat this year.
    COME ON BIG GREEN

    • HENH10

      Are you serious? Are you sure you don’t mean St. A’s or SNHU? Yes, you beat UNH this year, but the “Riverstone” IS Dartmouth’s NCAA tourney and just another game for UNH. And, if you look, it’s still 6-3-1 UNH since it started, so how is Dartmouth always better?
      I (and many other UNH fans) cheer for Dartmouth, since it is a NH school, where did that hostility come from? I wish them all the best, but that was a ridiculous post!

    • Lennyak1

      LMAO!

  • Where Eagles Dare

    I almost wish BC wasn’t #1 in the country (they will be in 48 hours, after Yale displayed their true colors this weekend)…I love it when Barry Melrose starts yapping about some WCHA, or CCHA team, then is baffled when BC players skate circles around everyone during the Frozen Four. Seriously, can any of you think of a Frozen Four when a team literally owned the tournament, as much as BC did last year?

    • Timmy

      Thanks for asking, looked a lot like Denver in ’05.

  • Elliot Olshansky

    Wouldn’t the fact that there are five WCHA teams mean that UNO doesn’t *have* to be switched? And in that case, wouldn’t the NCAA save a couple of plane flights by keeping Omaha in the west and RIT in the east?

  • guest

    Watch out for Maine ! If they can straighten out there defensive turnovers they might win the hockey east in the playoffs….

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