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College Hockey:
Bobcats Claw Bulldogs

— Two third period goals by David Marshall proved to be the difference in a big 6-4 Quinnipiac Bobcat home victory, over their I-91 rival, the Yale Bulldogs, at the TD Banknorth Sportscenter on Friday night.

“It’s no questions that it’s a rivalry,” Quinnipiac head coach Rand Pecknold said. “The kids get fired up to play.”

“The game was the annual ‘Heroes Hat’ game which commemorates those who sacrificed or risked their lives on September 11, 2001.

Sean Backman would register a hat trick for the Bulldogs (8-11-3, 5-9-1 ECACHL), but it would not be enough offensive power for Yale.

The opening minutes of the game were penalty filled, with both teams trying to get the edge early on.

Quinnipiac (13-8-5, 9-3-4 ECACHL) took an early scare with two penalties in the opening minute. Down five-on-three, the Bobcats were able to stop Yale from generating offensive momentum killing off both penalties.

The Bobcats out shot Yale in the first period, 16-3, but it was the Bulldogs who would strike first.

Six minutes into the game, Quinnipiac’s David Marshall took a charging penalty, and the Bulldogs capitalized. Blair Yaworski picked up a pass in the neutral zone and sent Sean Backman in on Fisher, where he clanked the puck off the crossbar, post and finally into the net for the 1-0 lead at 7:04 of the first.

Yale had their own five-on-three penalty kill and were able to kill off their own, to keep the score 1-0 Yale heading into the locker room after the first

The Bobcats finally solved Yale netminder Alec Richards and tied the score on their twentieth shot of the evening.

It was Matt Sorteberg with the goal, his third of the season. Reid Cashman picked off an attempted clear by Yale, sent across the blue line to Sorteberg, who rifled the puck and clanked it off the left post for the goal.

The Bobcats took their first lead of the game when Greg Holt deflected home a Cashman shot from the point, on the power play. Ben Nelson also recorded an assist on the goal.

Backman would tie the score at two, with his second of the game, when he was found the puck on the tape of his stick in the slot and banked it off Fisher’s glove for the goal.

The Bobcats went back ahead on a spectacular goal by David Marshall. Marshall got a pass from Brandon Wong behind the net and toe dragged between a Yale defenders legs and roof the puck for the lead.

“I played well tonight, but the whole team played great,” Marshall said.

Ben Nelson would help the Bobcats to a two goal lead, when he was on the door step and put home the rebound from Sorteberg’s shot.

Marshall would add his second of the game when he picked up a loose puck in a scrum in front of the net, in between Richards’ legs for the two goal lead.

“I tried to shooting it and it came back to me,” Marshall said. “I kind of threw it at the net and it just went in.”

Marshall was held pointless last weekend, and coach Pecknold worked him hard in practice this week.

“I challenged him [Marshall] this week and he responded,” Pecknold said.

Andrew Meyer would add an empty net goal for the Bobcats in the final minute to seal the victory and Mark Arcobello would add a goal in the final second.

Richards would make 35 saves in the losing effort; Fisher made 12.

“Richards had a great game and we were fortunate to convert on the power play tonight,” Pecknold said.

The Bobcat would have 25 shots on their 12 power play opportunities, converting on four of them.

Quinnipiac travels to Brown tomorrow, while Yale hosts Princeton.

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