Frozen Fenway 2017 returning to Boston with two Hockey East doubleheaders

Outdoor hockey is returning to Boston for the 2016-17 season with Frozen Fenway 2017, a two-week series of hockey and ice skating events taking place at Fenway Park from Jan. 4-16, 2017.

Frozen Fenway will feature two marquee Hockey East men’s doubleheaders, along with additional college and high school hockey games and a free public skating day for City of Boston residents.

“Outdoor hockey is quickly becoming a staple on Boston’s winter sports calendar and we look forward to joining with Hockey East and the City of Boston to build on that tradition by bringing some of the most accomplished and talented collegiate teams in the country to compete on the ice at Fenway Park,” said Boston Red Sox president Sam Kennedy in a news release.

The two Hockey East doubleheaders featuring eight of the premier college hockey programs in New England are scheduled to take place on Jan. 7 and 14. Game times to be announced at a later date:

Saturday, Jan. 7, 2017:
* Boston University vs. Massachusetts
* Boston College vs. Providence

Saturday, Jan. 14, 2017:
* Maine vs. Connecticut
* New Hampshire vs. Northeastern

“Hockey East and our schools could not be more excited to take the ice once again at Fenway Park,” added Hockey East commissioner Joe Bertagna. “Once Frozen Fenway 2017 is complete, all 12 Hockey East schools will have played an outdoor game at Fenway Park, creating once-in-a-lifetime memories for the players, students, alumni and fans.”

Along with the hockey games, Mayor Martin J. Walsh and the city of Boston will host a free public skate for residents to experience Frozen Fenway on Monday, Jan. 16, 2017.

Ticket information, along with additional Frozen Fenway games and events will be announced in the coming months.

12 COMMENTS

  1. Outdoor hockey. Wow, what a novel idea. College hockey needs new ideas like this to keep things fresh. If they could find a way to make the goalie more important and coaches could have a little more freedom to implement their new defensive systems to keep the play from getting too flashy, they will have perfected the game.

      • Funny, but when I see these NCAA games, including ones at Fenway with local Boston teams playing, I see rows and rows of empty seats. As for a once in a lifetime experience that Bertagna trumpets, there are players from dozens of NCAA teams that have played in multiple outdoor games while in college. Many programs have been in 3 or more of these games. There are dozens of these games every season and the majority of them at every level besides the NHL are played before small crowds and the atmosphere is awful.

        • Look at the teams giving up home games for this, (uconn, umass, northeastern, providence). They need about 3200 people to show up at Fenway to get a bigger crowd than a normal on-campus home game for those schools.

          I agree with you, outdoor games are old and tired, growing up in Minnesota I’ve listened to my uncles who came from an era where playing indoors was something special. As long it these games make some money for the school’s involved they will continue.

  2. Outdoor hockey. Wow, what a novel idea. College hockey needs new ideas like this to keep things fresh. If they could find a way to make the goalie more important and coaches could have a little more freedom to implement their new defensive systems to keep the play from getting too flashy, they will have perfected the game.

      • Funny, but when I see these NCAA games, including ones at Fenway with local Boston teams playing, I see rows and rows of empty seats. As for a once in a lifetime experience that Bertagna trumpets, there are players from dozens of NCAA teams that have played in multiple outdoor games while in college. Many programs have been in 3 or more of these games. There are dozens of these games every season and the majority of them at every level besides the NHL are played before small crowds and the atmosphere is awful.

        • Look at the teams giving up home games for this, (uconn, umass, northeastern, providence). They need about 3200 people to show up at Fenway to get a bigger crowd than a normal on-campus home game for those schools.

          I agree with you, outdoor games are old and tired, growing up in Minnesota I’ve listened to my uncles who came from an era where playing indoors was something special. As long it these games make some money for the school’s involved they will continue.

  3. Saw the Bs and Flyers the first time around. Well, let me re-phrase…I was at the park when the game was going on and I guess I could tell there was a hockey game going on because I could see a rink and movement on it, but I’ll be damned if I could actually see what was happening. Sucked so bad, that half way through the 2nd, I bailed and went to go watch the game at a bar. Point is, if you don’t have seats in the front of the 2nd deck, in the vicinity of both dugouts or above home plate, the experience will be less than spectacular. If your seats are in right field (like mine were), the game will be a waste of money.

  4. Saw the Bs and Flyers the first time around. Well, let me re-phrase…I was at the park when the game was going on and I guess I could tell there was a hockey game going on because I could see a rink and movement on it, but I’ll be damned if I could actually see what was happening. Sucked so bad, that half way through the 2nd, I bailed and went to go watch the game at a bar. Point is, if you don’t have seats in the front of the 2nd deck, in the vicinity of both dugouts or above home plate, the experience will be less than spectacular. If your seats are in right field (like mine were), the game will be a waste of money.

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